Erectile dysfunction can be extremely disheartening: how Viagra may help it

Viagra is used to treat erectile dysfunction in men that are typically older. It was developed first by scientists based in the United Kingdom, and was later marketed by Pfizer, a large multinational pharmaceutical company. The discovery was somewhat unintended because they were originally working on a drug to reduce hypertension and angina pectoris. During the initial trials, the drug was somewhat ineffective at treating angina pectoris, but it did a markedly better job at sustaining erections. By 1998, Viagra hit the market and became one of the top selling drugs. It earns about $1.93 billion in revenue for Pfizer annually. Viagra is shown to have no effect in people not suffering from erectile dysfunction, but it has been reported to have a strong placebo effect.

Is Viagra safe?

Viagra in South Africa is usually safe to consume provided that it is taken with the correct dosage amount. Overdosing can lead to bad side effects such as headaches, nasal congestion, impaired vision, photophobia, or light sensitivity, and indigestion. Rarer side effects include heart attack, hearing loss, increased intraocular pressure, and ventricular arrhythmias. It is also possible, though rare, for Viagra to cause vision loss. This can happen because Viagra causes a decrease in blood supply to the optic nerve. This usually occurs in people that already have high cholesterol, hypertension, or preexisting eye problems. People suffering from HIV should also be wary of taking Viagra. Taking protease inhibitors, a common medication for those with HIV, can interact badly with Viagra, which can increase the risk and severity of side effects. Other people with severe liver impairment, kidney disease, low blood pressure, recent heart attack or stroke, nitric oxide donor or other nitrates, should ask their doctor before taking viagra.

How to make Viagra work?

A common misconception is the viagra will do all of the work for you. You must first, however, be aroused before Viagra can work. Viagra is meant to enhance the erectile function a penis that has already been sexually stimulated. If there is no stimulation, Viagra cannot give an erection. When a man is sexually aroused, the nervous system will release nitric oxide to the erectile tissue of the penis. The nitric oxide stimulates an enzyme that can produces cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP causes the arteries in the penis to dilate, making the arteries and erectile tissue wider so that they can be filled with blood. Viagra helps by stopping cGMP from being reduced so that the arteries in the penis continue to be filled with blood.

What is the right dosage?

The dosage sizes usually come in 25mg, 50mg, or 100mg. The person takes a maximum of one pill per 24 hour period, 30 minutes to 1 hour before sexual intercourse. Overdosing on viagra can be a serious issue. People can experience vomiting, blurred vision, swelling or damage to the optic nerve, increased heart rate, blindness, muscle breakdown, and diarrhea.

Dr. John Hanson, MD

Trauma surgeon at Sydney Medical Centre
Dr. John Hanson, MD Dr. John Hanson, MD has been a resident of the Sydney area since the 1980's when he immigrated with his parents from South Africa after they were caught between the violence of two warlords. Dr. Hanson attended Sidney High School where he graduated at the top of his class. He went on to attend ANU Medical School where he studied for several years. Dr. Hanson graduated from ANU Medical School with a 4.0-grade point average and became an intern at Sydney Children's Hospital. Dr. Hanson was always trying to spend time outdoors where he would collect small animals and large insects to study. He would frequently come home with a tarantula in a box or a pet snake. One time Dr. Hanson discovered a baby Koala who was all alone after its parents were killed in a wildfire. Dr. Hanson nursed the baby Koala back to health and he continued to raise it since it had no hope of being reintroduced to the wild. Dr. Hanson became known for his pet Koala and he would even bring the Koala which he named Reginald to the hospital to visit sick children. Dr. Hanson quickly became a legendary name at the children's hospital where he worked as an intern thanks to his buddy Reginald. Upon concluding his internship, Dr. Hanson went on to become a resident Doctor at Sydney Medical Centre where he treated burn victims, car accident victims, and other traumatic injuries. The ability to operate with a steady hand and remain focused despite the grievous injuries in front of him earned him a reputation for being the best at the hospital. Sydney Children's Hospital offered Dr. Hanson a position on the board in 2014 and in 2017 Dr. Hanson became the President of the Sydney Children's Hospital but still maintained his role at Sydney Medical Centre as a trauma surgeon. The ability to work calmly under pressure is the trait of a good doctor and Dr. Hanson is no exception. He has a cunning business sense and a heart filled with passion for helping others and is known as an asset to the community of Sydney.
Dr. John Hanson, MD

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